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DeKalb Medical at Downtown Decatur Community Health Report

June 29, 2016

                               

 

For Immediate Release

DeKalb Medical at Downtown Decatur Community Health Needs Assessment

Table of Contents

DeKalb Mission Statement 2

Our Mission. 3

Our Vision. 3

Executive Summary. 5

DeKalb Medical System:  Community Health Needs Assessment Overview, Methodology and Approach  9

Consultant Qualifications & Collaboration. 9

Defining the Community Served. 9

DeKalb Medical System Community Health Needs Assessment Community Served Definition. 10

Assessment of Health Needs – Methodology and Data Sources. 11

Quantitative Assessment of Health Needs. 11

Qualitative Assessment of Health Needs (Community Input) 14

Methodology for Defining Community Need. 14

Information Gaps. 16

Existing Resources to Address Health Needs. 16

Prioritizing Community Health Needs. 16

Evaluation of Implementation Strategy Impact 16

DeKalb Medical System Community Health Needs Assessment 17

Demographic and Socioeconomic Summary. 17

Public Health Indicators. 22

Truven Health Community Data. 22

Focus Groups and Interviews. 25

Health Needs Matrix. 30

Prioritizing Community Health Needs. 31

Description of Health Needs to be Addressed. 32

Appendix A: Key Health Indicator Sources. 35

Appendix B: Interview and Focus Group Participants and the Communities Served. 36

Appendix C:  Community Resources Identified to Potentially Address Significant Health Needs. 38

Appendix D:  Community Benefit Summary 2013 Needs Assessment 40

 


 

DeKalb Mission Statement

OUR MEDICAL MISSION AND VISION

Our Mission

At DeKalb Medical System, our mission is to earn our community’s trust every day, through our uncompromising commitment to quality.

Our Vision

In partnership with the best physicians, employees, and volunteers, DeKalb Medical System will be the healthcare provider of choice by delivering a superior patient experience every time.

WHO WE ARE

DeKalb Medical System is more than just a hospital. We are a not-for-profit health system, comprised of three hospital campuses; DeKalb Medical at North Decatur, DeKalb Medical at Hillandale, and DeKalb Medical at Downtown Decatur.

Known for premier clinical services, the latest technological advances, and a caring and highly trained staff, DeKalb Medical System serves DeKalb County and metro Atlanta. DeKalb Medical System includes 628 acute care beds, more than 700 doctors skilled in 55 medical specialties, over 30 physician practices in DeKalb and
Gwinnett counties, and
3,900 employees. DeKalb Medical System is an established and active member of the community, offering a variety of award-winning, accessible services.

We are trusted to provide the highest possible level of patient safety and hospital quality when we are caring for our patients, their family members, and their friends. We take that trust seriously. At DeKalb Medical System, quality is defined as safety, superior clinical outcomes, and service excellence for every patient every day.

 


OUR CORE VALUES & QUALITY PRINCIPLES

DeKalb Medical System embodies the values of I REACH:

  • Integrity: honest, ethical, trustworthy, and committed
  • Respect: acknowledge and appreciate diversity and show respect for all
  • Excellence: deliver high-quality care with great service, taking pride in all we do
  • Accountability: hold ourselves responsible for achieving the goals that have been defined and measured, and we take responsibility for our actions
  • Compassion: remember that those who come to us for help need us to care about them as much as we would our own families
  • Helping Hands: we are part of a team; we work together, helping each other when we see a need, not just when we are asked to help

 

 


 

DeKalb Medical System understands the importance of serving the health needs of its communities. In order to do that successfully, we must first take a comprehensive look at the issues our patients, their families, and neighbors face when making healthy life choices and health care decisions.

The first community health needs assessment was conducted in 2013. Beginning in October 2015, the organization began the process of re-assessing the current health needs of the communities served by all DeKalb Medical System hospitals.  Truven Health Analytics was engaged to help collect and analyze the data for this process and to compile a final report made publicly available on July 1, 2016.

For the 2016 assessment, DeKalb Medical at Downtown Decatur has defined its community to be the geographical area of DeKalb, Fulton, and Gwinnett counties.  The community served was determined based on the counties that makes up 75% percent of the hospital facility’s admissions over a period of the past 12 months.

A quantitative and qualitative assessment was performed by Truven Health Analytics, an IBM Company, with the assistance of Jessica Korona and Kirsten Reed, both working with DeKalb Medical System through the master’s program at the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University. More than 100 public health indicators were evaluated for the quantitative analysis. Community needs were identified by comparing the community’s value for each indicator to that of the state and nation. Where the community value was worse than the state, the indicator was identified as a community health need. After initial community needs were identified, an index of magnitude analysis was conducted to determine the relative severity of the issue.

Input from the community was gathered for the qualitative analysis via focus groups and interviews. Focus group participants and interviewees included community leaders, public health experts, and those representing the needs of minority, underserved, and indigent populations.

The outcomes of the quantitative and qualitative analyses were aligned to create a comprehensive list of community health needs.  Next, the health needs were compiled to create a health needs matrix to illustrate where the qualitative and quantitative data correspond as well as differ. 

In May 2016, a prioritization meeting was held in which the health needs matrix was reviewed by DeKalb Medical System leadership to establish and prioritize significant needs.  The meeting was moderated by Truven Health Analytics and included an overview of the community demographics, summary of health data findings, and review of the identified community health needs.

Participants all agreed the health needs which deserved the most attention and considered significant were those identified through the quantitative analysis as worse than benchmark by a greater magnitude as well as those identified through the qualitative analysis.

The individuals participating in the prioritization meeting identified several criteria to prioritize the significant health needs for each community. Once the prioritization criteria were determined, each significant health need was rated on the criteria resulting in an overall score.  The list of significant health needs was than prioritized based on the overall scores.

The meeting participants subsequently chose from the top prioritized health needs as those which will be addressed by DeKalb Medical at Downtown Decatur. The needs to be addressed are as follows:

  1. Education and training of community providers
  2. Education and collaboration between resources
  3. Access to long-term care

A description of each chosen need is included in the body of this report. Subsequently, the hospital facility will develop an implementation strategy including specific initiatives to address the chosen health needs. The implementation strategy will be completed and adopted by DeKalb Medical at Downtown Decatur on or before November 15, 2016.

A summary report of interventions and activities outlined in the implementation strategy drafted after the 2013 assessment was also completed and is included in Appendix D of this document.

The Community Health Needs Assessment for DeKalb Medical at Downtown Decatur has been presented and approved by DeKalb Medical System’s Regional Board of Director’s Governing, Risk and Compliance Committee and the full assessment is available to the public at no cost for download on our website at www.dekalbmedical.org.

This assessment and corresponding implementation strategies are intended to meet the requirements for community benefit planning and reporting as set federal laws, including but not limited to: Internal Revenue Code Section 501(r).


 

Community Health Needs Assessment Requirement

As a result of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), all tax-exempt organizations operating hospital facilities are required to assess the health needs of their community through a Community Health Needs Assessment (CHNA) once every three years.  A CHNA is a written document developed for a hospital facility that defines the community served by the organization and the process used to conduct the assessment. The explanation of the  process includes how the hospital took into account input from community members, public health department(s), and members or representatives of medically underserved, low-income, and minority populations; the identification of any organizations with whom the hospital has worked on the assessment; the significant health needs identified through the assessment process are discussed.

The written CHNA Report must include descriptions of the following:

  • The community served and how the community was determined
  • The process and methods used to conduct the assessment including sources and dates of the data and other information as well as the analytical methods applied to identify significant community health needs
  • How the organization took into account input from persons representing the broad interests of the community served by the hospital, including a description of when and how the hospital consulted with these persons or the organizations they represent
  • The prioritized community health needs identified through the CHNA as well as a description of the process and criteria used in prioritizing the identified significant needs
  • The existing health care facilities and other resources within the community available to meet the significant community health needs
  • An evaluation of the impact of any actions that were taken, since the hospital  facility(s) most recent CHNA, to address the significant health needs identified in that last CHNA

The PPACA also requires hospitals to adopt an Implementation Strategy to address prioritized community health needs identified through the assessment. An Implementation Strategy is a written plan that addresses each of the significant community health needs identified through the CHNA and is a separate but related document to the CHNA report.

The written Implementation Strategy must include the following:

  • List of the prioritized needs the hospital plans to address and the rationale for not addressing other significant health needs identified
  • Actions the hospital intends to take to address the chosen health needs
  • The anticipated impact of these actions and the plan to evaluate such impact (e.g. identify data sources that will be used to track the plan’s impact)
  • Identify programs and resources the hospital plans to commit to address the health needs
  • Describe any planned collaboration between the hospital and other facilities or organizations in addressing the health needs

A CHNA is considered conducted in the taxable year that the written report of its findings, as described above, is approved by the hospital’s governing body and made widely available to the public. The Implementation Strategy is considered adopted on the date it is approved by the governing body. Organizations must approve and make public their Implementation Strategy by the 15th day of the 5th month following the end of the tax year. CHNA compliance is reported on IRS Form 990, Schedule H.

DeKalb Medical System partnered with Truven Health Analytics, an IBM Company (Truven Health) to complete a CHNA for DeKalb Medical at Downtown Decatur.

Consultant Qualifications & Collaboration

Truven Health and its legacy companies have been delivering analytic tools, benchmarks, and strategic consulting services to the healthcare industry for over 50 years.  Truven Health combines rich data analytics in demographics (including the Community Needs Index, developed with Catholic Healthcare West, now Dignity Health), planning, and disease prevalence estimates with experienced strategic consultants to deliver comprehensive and actionable CHNAs. 

Defining the Community Served

For the purpose of this assessment, DeKalb Medical at Downtown Decatur defined the community served by its facility based on the counties that make up 75% percent of the facility’s inpatient and outpatient admissions over a period of the past 12 months.


 

DeKalb Medical System Community Health Needs Assessment Community Served Definition

For the 2016 assessment, DeKalb Medical at Downtown Decatur has defined its community to be the geographical area of DeKalb, Fulton, and Gwinnett counties.  The community served was determined based on the counties that make up 75% percent of the hospital facility’s inpatient and outpatient admissions over a period of the past 12 months.

DeKalb Medical at Downton Decatur Community Health Needs Assessment

Map of Community Served


Assessment of Health Needs – Methodology and Data Sources

To assess the health needs of the community served, a quantitative and qualitative approach was taken.  In addition to collecting data from public and Truven Health proprietary sources, interviews and focus groups were conducted with individuals representing public health, community leaders and groups, public organizations, and other providers.

Quantitative Assessment of Health Needs

Quantitative data in the form of public health indicators were collected and analyzed to assess community health needs.  Eight categories consisting of 104 indicators were collected and evaluated for the counties where data was available.  The categories and indicators collected are included in the table below. The sources of the indicators utilized in the quantitative assessment can be found in Appendix A.

Population

  • High School Graduation Rate
  • Some College
  • Median Household Income
  • Births to Unmarried Women
  • Children in Poverty
  • Families in Poverty
  • Children in Single-Parent Households
  • Income Inequality
  • Children Eligible for Free Lunch
  • Unemployment
  • Residential Segregation

Injury & Death

  • Alcohol-impaired Driving Deaths
  • Drug Overdose Deaths
  • Infant Mortality
  • Child Mortality
  • All Other Mental and Behavioral Disorder Deaths
  • Infant Mortality by Race: Black
  • Infant Mortality by Race: Hispanic
  • Infant Mortality by Race: White
  • Major Cardiovascular Deaths
  • Lung Cancer Deaths
  • COPD Deaths
  • Diabetes Deaths
  • Chronic Kidney Disease Deaths
  • Heart Disease Deaths
  • Overall Cancer Deaths
  • Chronic Lower Respiratory Disease (CLRD) Deaths
  • Stroke Deaths
  • Motor Vehicle Crash Mortality Rate
  • Injury Deaths
  • Unintentional Injury Deaths
  • Premature Deaths

Mental Health

  • Adults Lacking Social-Emotional Support
  • Population to Mental Health Provider Ratio
  • Mental Health Status
  • Suicide Rate

Health Outcomes

  • Cancer (all causes) Incidence
  • Breast Cancer Incidence
  • Prostate Cancer Incidence
  • Colon Cancer Incidence
  • Diabetes
  • All Other Endocrine, Nutritional, and Metabolic Diseases
  • Alzheimer’s/ Dementia
  • All Other Mental and Behavioral Disorders
  • Major Cardiovascular Disease
  • HIV
  • External Cause of Injury (all)
  • Percent Low Birth Weight Births
  • Preterm Births
  • Poor or Fair Health Status
  • Poor Physical Health Days
  • Diseases of Musculoskeletal System and Connective Tissue
  • Blood Poisoning (Septicemia)
  • All Other Diseases of the Genitourinary System
  • Pneumonia
  • Falls
  • Diabetes
  • Hypertension
  • Lung Cancer Incidence
  • Heart Disease
  • Smoking During Pregnancy
  • Births to Mothers with No Diploma or GED

Health Behaviors

  • Youth Obesity
  • Youth Exercise
  • Excessive Drinking: Adults Reporting Binge / Heavy Drinking
  • Sexually Transmitted Infections Incidence Rate
  • Insufficient Sleep
  • Adult Obesity
  • Physical Inactivity
  • Few Fruits/Vegetables
  • Adult Smoking
  • Adolescent Smoking
  • Teen Births
  • Chlamydia Incidence

 

Prevention

  • Diabetic Screening (Medicare Enrollees)
  • Mammography Screening (Medicare Enrollees)
  • Flu Vaccine 65+
  • Pneumonia Vaccine
  • Pap Smear
  • Colorectal Screening

Access to Care

  • Uninsured Adults
  • Uninsured Children
  • Primary Care
  • Primary Care Providers (non-physician)
  • Ambulatory Sensitive Discharges for Avoidable Illnesses
  • Health Care Costs
  • Delayed Care Due to Cost
  • Population to Dentist
  • Ambulatory Sensitive Discharges for Acute Conditions
  • Ambulatory Sensitive Discharges for Chronic Conditions
  • Rate of Preventable Hospital Stays

Environment

  • Limited Access to Healthy Foods
  • Food Insecurity
  • Food Environment Index
  • Drinking Water Violations
  • Daily Particulate Matter Days
  • Severe Housing Problems
  • Long Commute – Driving Alone
  • % Households with No Vehicle Available
  • Social Associations
  • Homicides
  • Violent Crime Rate
  • Recreational and Fitness Facilities
  • Driving to Work Alone
  • Unduplicated Count of Children With a Substantial Incident of Child Abuse and/or Neglect

To determine the public health indicators which demonstrate a community health need, a benchmark analysis was conducted.  Benchmark health indicators collected included (when available) national, state, and goal setting benchmarks such as Healthy People 2020 and County Health Rankings Best Performer.

Health Indicator Benchmark Analysis

Example

According the America’s Health Rankings, Georgia ranks 40th out of the 50 states. The health status of Georgia compared to other states in the nation identifies many opportunities to impact health within local communities even for those communities that rank highly within the state.  Therefore, the benchmark for the community served was set to the state value.  Needs were identified when one or more of the indicators for the community served did not meet state benchmarks. An index of magnitude analysis was then conducted on those indicators that did not meet state benchmarks in order to understand to what degree they differ from the benchmark in order to understand their relative severity of need.

The outcomes of the quantitative data analysis were then compared to the qualitative data findings.


 

Qualitative Assessment of Health Needs (Community Input)

In addition to analyzing quantitative data, two focus groups, collectively comprised of twenty-three (23) participants, and thirty-eight (38) key informant interviews were conducted December, 2015 through January, 2016. These were conducted to collect information from persons representing the broad interests of the community served.  The focus groups and interviews were conducted to solicit feedback from leaders and representatives who serve the community and have insight into its needs. 

Focus groups are designed to familiarize participants with the CHNA process and gain an understanding of population’s health needs from the community’s perspective.  Focus groups are formatted for both individual and small group feedback; moreover, this forum also assists with the identification of other community organizations currently addressing health needs in the community. 

The interviews conducted by Truven Health are intended to assist with gaining an understanding and achieving insight into the individual’s perception of the overall health status of the community and the primary drivers contributing to the identified health issues.

To qualitatively assess the health needs of the community, participation was solicited from state, local, tribal, or regional governmental public health departments (or equivalent departments or agencies) with knowledge, information, or expertise relevant to the health needs of the community. Also, individuals or organizations serving and/or representing the interests of the medically underserved, low-income, and minority populations in the community were included.

To ensure the input received also represented the broad interests of the community served, participation was also sought from community leaders, groups, public health organizations, other healthcare organizations, and other healthcare providers.

In addition to requesting input from public health and various interests of the community, hospitals are also required to take into consideration written input received on their most recently conducted CHNA and subsequent implementation strategies.

DeKalb Medical System has made the full report available and welcomes public comment or feedback on the findings. Public comments and feedback may be submitted by contacting Don Fears, Director of Regulatory and Government Relations for DeKalb Medical System at (404) 501-5790. To date we have not received such written input but continue to welcome feedback from the community.

The information collected from the interviewees and focus group participants were organized into primary themes surrounding community needs. The identified needs were then compared to the quantitative data findings.

Methodology for Defining Community Need

The interview and focus group feedback was combined with the health indicator data, and the primary issues currently impacting the health of the community served were consolidated and assembled in the Health Needs Matrix below. This was done to assist with the identification of the significant health needs for the community served.

The upper right quadrant of the matrix is where the qualitative data (interview and focus group feedback) and quantitative data (health indicators) converge.

Source: Truven Health Analytics, 2016

 

 

 


 


Information Gaps

The majority of public health indicators are available for counties and do not exceed this level of granularity; moreover, in Georgia, health indicators are not available for every county due to variation in population density. In evaluating data for entire counties versus more localized data, it is difficult to understand the health needs for specific populations within a county.  It can also be a challenge to tailor programs to address specific community health needs as placement and access to such programs may not actually impact the individuals in need of the service. Truven Health supplemented the health indicator data with Truven Health’s ZIP code estimates to assist in identifying specific populations within a community where health needs may be greater.

Existing Resources to Address Health Needs

Part of the assessment process included gathering input on community resources potentially available to address the significant health needs identified through the CHNA.  A description of these resources is provided in Appendix C.

Prioritizing Community Health Needs

The prioritization of community health needs identified through the assessment was based on the weight of the quantitative and qualitative data obtained when assessing the community. It also included an evaluation of the severity of each need as it pertains to the state benchmark, value the community places on the need, and the prevalence of the need within the community.  A thorough description of the process can be found in the “Prioritizing Community Health Needs” section of the assessment.

The community health needs identified through the assessment were reviewed and prioritized by the Senior Vice President and Chief Strategy Officer, Vice President of Legal Services and Chief Compliance Officer, Vice President of Marketing, Communications and Corporate Health, Vice President of the DeKalb Medical Foundation, and the Director of Regulatory and Government Relations.

Evaluation of Implementation Strategy Impact

As part of the current assessment, DeKalb Medical System conducted an evaluation of the implementation strategies adopted as part of the 2013 CHNAs. In 2013, DeKalb Medical at Downtown Decatur chose to address the following identified needs:

  1. Serve as a resource for patients, families, and the community
  2. Provide resources to promote communication among healthcare providers

An implementation strategy was put into place in 2013 to address the above needs.  That strategy has been evaluated as to its effectiveness and impact. Details for that evaluation can be found in Appendix D with the report of interventions and activities outlined in the implementation strategy drafted after the 2013 assessment.


 

DeKalb Medical System Community Health Needs Assessment

Demographic and Socioeconomic Summary                              

When evaluating the population statistics for the area served, the state of Georgia’s characteristics are similar in many categories. The primary differences exist in the projected growth over the next five years of older individuals and the percent of the population that is made up of non-white individuals. The community is projected to grow 7% over the next five years compared to 5% growth in the state and 4% in the United States. The community served is also similar to the state of Georgia as it relates to socioeconomic barriers; differences include a slightly higher proportion of the population that faces language barriers, a marginally higher median income, and fewer individuals with a high school diploma in the area served than in the state.

Demographic and Socioeconomic Comparison:

Community Served and State/US Benchmarks

Source: Truven Health Analytics, 2016

The population of the community served is expected to grow 7% (177,495 people) by 2020.  The estimated population growth is higher than what is projected for the state (5%) and nation (4%).  Gwinnett County is projected to experience an 8% (65,320 people) increase in the population, which is the largest of the counties included in the community serving DeKalb Medical at Downtown Decatur. This is followed by a 7% (74,248 people) increase in Fulton County, and a 5% (37,927 people) increase in DeKalb County. The ZIP codes in Gwinnett County projected to experience the largest amount of growth are 30024 in Suwanee and 30043 and 30044, both located in Lawrenceville. ZIP codes 30004 in Alpharetta and 30349 in Union City are expected to have the largest amount of growth in Fulton County.

Age distribution is consistent across the counties included in the community. The largest cohort are those between eighteen (18) and forty-four (44) years of age; they comprise approximately 40% in all three counties. Individuals less than eighteen (18) years old make up approximately 25% of the population, and those between the ages of forty-five (45) and sixty-four (64) also make up 25% of the population for all three counties. Approximately 10% of the population in the community are those aged sixty-five (65) and older. The cohort aged sixty-five years of age and older is currently the smallest; however, it is expected to experience the most growth over the next five years. This cohort is projected to increase by 80,755 people (30%). Growth in this population will likely contribute to an increased need for health services as the population continues to age. The only cohort expected to experience shrinkage across all three counties are those between the ages of eighteen (18) and forty-four (44) years old in DeKalb County; the decrease is projected to be 2.2% (6,838).

Population by Age Cohort

            2015 Total Population

5 Year Projected Population Growth Rate

Source: Truven Health Analytics, 2016

         

When evaluating the total population by race, it is evenly distributed, for the most part, between the black (40%) and white (43%) races. The Asian/Pacific Islander residents make up 8% of the population, and 6% of the population is made up of other races. The smallest consists of those that are multiracial (3%). DeKalb County is primarily black (52%) and Gwinnett County is predominately white (51%). Diversity in the community will increase slightly due to the projected growth of minority populations over the next five years. The community will experience the largest growth in the Asian/Pacific Islander (12,639) and Multi-racial (32,922) residents.  The graphs below display the community’s total population breakdown by race (including all ethnicities).

Population by Race

                  2015 Total Population                

5 Year Projected Population Growth Rate

Source: Truven Health Analytics, 2016

            

The Hispanic population currently comprises 13% of the population and is not expected to experience growth over the next 5 years. Gwinnett County has the largest Hispanic population (21%) compared to DeKalb (10%) and Fulton (8%) counties. Although a change is not projected over the next five years for the overall community, Gwinnett County is estimated to experience a small increase (26,455 people). The graphs below display the community’s population breakdown by ethnicity (including all races). 

Population by Hispanic Ethnicity

                  2015 Total Population                

5 Year Projected Population Growth Rate

Source: Truven Health Analytics, 2016

The median household income for the community served is $50,629. Sixty-three percent (63%) of the community is commercially insured. The commercially insured population includes those purchasing insurance through the health insurance exchange marketplace and those receiving insurance through an employer. The number of people receiving insurance through the exchange is expected to experience the largest amount of growth over the next five years.  Currently, 9% of the population has Medicare; this is projected to grow over the next five years due to the expected increase in those aged 65 years and above. The uninsured population makes up 16% of the community. Medicaid covers 12% of the community.

Estimated Covered Lives


The following ZIP codes comprise the largest number of individuals that are uninsured:

  • 30044 – Lawrenceville
  • 30314 – Atlanta
  • 30315 – Atlanta
  • 30349 – Atlanta

 

2015 Estimated Uninsured Lives by ZIP Code

Source: Truven Health Analytics, 2016


 


 

The Truven Health Community Need Index (CNI) is a statistical approach to identifying health needs in a community. The CNI takes into account vital socio-economic factors (income, cultural, education, insurance and housing) about a community to generate a CNI score for every populated ZIP code in the United States. The CNI is strongly linked to variations in community healthcare needs and is a strong indicator of a community’s demand for various healthcare services.  The CNI score by ZIP code identifies specific areas within a community where healthcare needs may be greater.

On a scale of one to five with five indicating the greatest amount of need, the community served has an overall CNI score of 4.0, which is higher than the national average. The primary barriers driving the needs of the community include income, culture, education, insurance, and housing. Gwinnett County’s CNI is 3.5 which is the lowest among the three counties that comprise the community served. This is compared to 3.7 in Fulton County and 4.1 in DeKalb County. The community has an overall CNI Score of 4.0.

2015 Community Need Index by ZIP Code

Highest Need

Lowest Need

Source: Truven Health Analytics, 2016

 

 

 

 

 


 

Public Health Indicators

Public health indicators were collected and analyzed to assess the community’s health needs.  For each health indicator, a comparison was made between the most recently available community data and benchmarks for the same/similar indicator. Benchmarks were based on available data and included the United States and the state of Georgia.  A health need was identified when the community indicator did not meet the state’s comparative benchmark.  The indicators that did not meet the state benchmark for this community included the following: 

Population

  • High School Graduation Rate
  • Births to Unmarried Women
  • Children in Poverty
  • Families in Poverty
  • Children in Single-Parent Households
  • Income Inequality
  • Children Eligible for Free Lunch
  • Unemployment
  • Residential Segregation

Injury & Death

  • Alcohol-impaired Driving Deaths
  • Drug Overdose Deaths
  • Infant Mortality
  • Child Mortality
  • All Other Mental and Behavioral Disorder Deaths
  • Infant Mortality by Race: Black
  • Infant Mortality by Race: Hispanic
  • Infant Mortality by Race: White

Mental Health

  • Adults Lacking Social-emotional Support
  • Population to Mental Health Provider Ratio

 

Prevention

  • Diabetic Screening (Medicare Enrollees)
  • Mammography Screening (Medicare Enrollees)
  • Flu Vaccine 65+
  • Pneumonia Vaccine
  • Pap Smear

Health Outcomes

  • Cancer (all causes) Incidence
  • Breast Cancer Incidence
  • Prostate Cancer Incidence
  • Colon Cancer Incidence
  • Diabetes
  • All Other Endocrine, Nutritional, and Metabolic Diseases
  • Alzheimer’s/ Dementia
  • All Other Mental and Behavioral Disorders
  • Major Cardiovascular Disease
  • HIV
  • External Causes of Injury (all)
  • Percent Low Birth Weight Births
  • Preterm Births

 

Health Behaviors

  • Youth Obesity
  • Youth Exercise
  • Excessive Drinking: Adults Reporting Binge or Heavy Drinking
  • Sexually Transmitted Infections Incidence Rate
  • Insufficient Sleep

Access to Care

  • Uninsured Adults
  • Uninsured Children
  • Primary Care
  • Primary Care Providers (non-physician)
  • Ambulatory Sensitive Discharges for Avoidable Illnesses

Environment

  • Limited Access to Healthy Foods
  • Food Insecurity
  • Food Environment Index
  • Drinking Water Violations
  • Daily Particulate Matter Days
  • Severe Housing Problems
  • Long Commute – Driving Alone
  • % Households with No Vehicle Available
  • Social Associations
  • Homicides
  • Violent Crime Rate

 


 

Truven Health Community Data

Truven Health Analytics supplemented the publically available data with estimates of localized disease prevalence for heart disease and cancer as well as emergency department visit estimates. 

Unsurprisingly, Truven Health Heart Disease Estimates identified hypertension as the most prevalent heart disease diagnosis across all three counties included in the community served.  This was followed by arrhythmias and ischemic heart disease.

2015 Estimated Heart Disease Cases

Source: Truven Health Analytics, 2016

Truven Health’s 2015 Cancer Estimates predict breast, prostate, and colorectal cancers to be the most prevalent. The incidence of both breast and prostate cancers is higher in the community than in the state and nation. The incidence of colorectal cancer is slightly lower than the state and nation. Gwinnett County is projected to experience a 21% increase in new cancer cases over the next five years, this is equivalent to 758 cases. Fulton and DeKalb counties are projected to increase by 17% (971 new cases) and 15% (591 new cases), respectively.

2015 Estimated Cancer Cases

Source: Truven Health Analytics, 2016

Truven Health estimates emergent ED visits to increase 23% in the community over the next five years. Non-emergent ED visits are lower acuity visits that present in the ED but possibly can be treated in other more appropriate, less intensive outpatient settings.  ZIP codes 30349, located in Atlanta, and 30044, located in Lawrenceville, experience the highest amount of non-emergent ED visits; these ZIP codes are highly populated by minorities. Non-emergent ED visits can be an indication that there are systematic issues with access to primary care or managing chronic conditions. There is a projected change of 3% among non-emergent visits over the next five years.

Emergent and Non-Emergent ED Visits

Source: Truven Health Analytics, 2016

                                  2014 Estimated Non-Emergent Visits by ZIP Code     

Source: Truven Health Analytics, 2016


Focus Groups and Interviews

DeKalb Medical System engaged Truven Health to conduct a series of focus groups and to assess the community’s perception of health needs in the populations they serve.   There were two community focus groups; combined, twenty-three participants were included in the exercise. Participants included individuals from organizations serving medically underserved, low-income, minorities and populations with chronic disease needs in the community as well as public health representatives. The focus group was moderated by a Truven representative and was conducted in two parts. The first session was held with the entire group.  Participants were divided into two groups for smaller breakout discussions for the second session. The discussions were oriented around the following questions:

  1. Assess the health of the community on a scale of 1-5 (1 being the worst and 5 being the best)
  2. Identify the top three health needs of the community
  3. Discuss the similarities/differences between the needs identified in the prior exercise and the needs identified in prior assessments

The groups included representatives from the counties of DeKalb, Fulton, and Gwinnett, all located in Georgia. The community served by DeKalb Medical at North Decatur includes DeKalb County.

DeKalb Medical at Downtown Decatur is a long-term acute care facility caring for patients with complex medical and rehabilitative needs. The patients typically experience a two to six week length of stay. Patients cared for at the facility include, but are not limited to, those with neurological and infectious diseases, multi-system failure, catastrophic injuries, extensive post-operative complications, and those requiring rehabilitative treatments. The facility is accessible as it is conveniently located within walking distance of the local community. There is significant green space in Decatur, and the community is walkable. Moreover, the senior population is considered to be healthy and active; however, transportation is an issue for this population.

When the focus group participants discussed the outlying areas of the community, not the areas adjacent to DeKalb Medical at Downtown Decatur, a different perception was provided by the group. DeKalb County has minimal economic growth with the wealthier populations migrating to the northern portion of the county. Interstate 20 divides the community both geographically and socioeconomically. The group reported the majority of those residing south of the interstate as being African-American with a dense population of uninsured residents. Also, this southern-most region of the county possesses higher crime rates, food deserts and swamps, lower economic growth, and fewer health care providers.  The group expressed belief that these factors contribute to more needs for the community as they pertain to health.

The represented communities included diverse populations with significant differences in socioeconomics, education, access to care, and health status. According to participants, DeKalb County is one of the most diverse counties in the state. The focus group participants identified overarching drivers that contribute to the health needs and priorities. One of the major themes identified by the focus groups included access to health care. Specific drivers of this issue included transportation and the need for consolidating providers. Health literacy was also identified as a characteristic of the community increasing the health needs. The recognized needs that pertain to health literacy included the need for patient education and training and the lack of diversity and cultural competency in the community served.  Lastly, the groups identified major needs surrounding the prevention and management of chronic diseases and mental health.

Access to Care

As previously stated, access to care, transportation and the need for the consolidation of providers were identified as health needs. As previously mentioned, DeKalb Medical at Downtown Decatur is a long-term acute care facility. With this being said, those residing in the downtown area may have difficulty accessing short-term acute care services. Much of the community served utilizes the ED for primary care services. This limits continuity of care due the absence of having a lasting relationship with a primary care physician in the community. For many, the necessary resources are not available; however, when resources are available, many do not access the system due to unaffordability.  Access to specialty physicians is limited in the community which makes it difficult for chronic diseases to be managed. The lack of Medicaid expansion in the state of Georgia also adds complexity to pre-existing issues. The working poor live in a “gap” which leaves them either uninsured or underinsured and unable to afford private coverage. The limits of the community surrounding access to care primarily include the lack of services and coverage. Focus group members also mentioned access to care being negatively impacted by the lack of support for DeKalb Medical System by the local government. For example, insurance provided to local government employees does not cover services provided by DeKalb Medical System; this not only limits access for the employees, but also reduces resources provided to the facility. Local businesses and the county do not collaborate on supporting the hospital which is impacting access to care within the community.

Transportation

Although areas adjacent to DeKalb Medical at Downtown Decatur are walkable, much of the population continues to rely on public transportation. Specifically, the participants mentioned the dependence seniors have on public transportation, regardless of socioeconomic status. The expense and time consumption of the public transportation system often prohibits community members from receiving adequate medical treatment. Using the public transportation system to reach health care providers greatly increases the time utilized causing absenteeism from work or school. The focus group members felt that many residents forgo seeing a physician due to the loss of income from missing work.

Consolidation of Providers

Community partnerships are progressing with the goal of leveraging resources to better coordinate care; however, competitiveness remains a challenge. The consolidation of services by providers serving the same or similar needs would allow additional services to be provided, thus eliminating duplication.

 

 

Health Literacy

The focus groups identified multiple issues surrounding health literacy and the negative impact its absence places on the community. Specifically, it was noted that many residents in the community are now insured under the new health care exchanges implemented with the Affordable Care Act. The focus group discussed the large number of residents utilizing the exchanges for health care coverage in the community served. Newly insured residents do not have the ability to navigate the health care system, and they often do not understand insurance coverage.

Patient Education and Training

It was noted that health literacy is not only an issue as it pertains to coverage; there are also issues surrounding the prevention and management of chronic disease. For many individuals, late diagnosis and treatment of chronic illnesses are leading to poor outcomes. Existing education programs are inadequate and do not reach those residing in rural areas. The groups also expressed the lack of understanding regarding chronic disease and the impact delayed care often has on the outcome. Understanding the signs and symptoms of a stroke is a specific example provided by the group that is vital to prevent serious, long-term complications that impact the quality of life. Other areas of education in which the focus group identified included the importance of a healthy diet and exercise, the increased availability and use of wellness programs, and the impact of non-compliance.

Diversity and Cultural Competency

Existing health literacy issues are further complicated by language and cultural barriers that exist within the community. Cultural beliefs often lead to mistrust of the health care system and individuals refusing to seek care. Focus groups discussed the opportunities surrounding education and outreach; specifically, the need for health education in the Hispanic community.

Chronic Disease and Mental Health Management

As previously mentioned, a lack of knowledge exists within the community regarding chronic disease prevention and management. Diet and exercise is a factor contributing to the prevalence of chronic disease. Food swamps and deserts are prevalent; however, a mobile farmers market does exist to provide fresh fruits and vegetables throughout the community. As discussed by the group, the lack of specialty physicians in the community leaves many patients not seeing the providers needed to manage their conditions. Specific chronic diseases mentioned by the focus groups include diabetes, cancer, HIV/AIDS, chronic renal failure, and mental health. The lack of health and wellness in the community contributes to the prevalence of chronic disease.

An additional population often suffering from chronic conditions are those with mental illness. The focus group also discussed the need for a better system to provide local services to this population, as they are often forced to seek care in the ED due to a lack of providers. Mental health and substance abuse are not controlled within the community, and there is a stigma associated with the diagnosis. The limited awareness of the disease often prevents individuals from seeking early intervention. Mental health and substance abuse are prevalent in all socioeconomic and demographic groups leading to the need for increased support and treatment options. 

Funding and Leadership

Lastly, the group expressed the need for strong community leaders and funding to assist with improving factors that drive the health status of the community. The group expressed a primary factor contributing to the low economic growth in the community being the oerception of corruption among local government agencies and school board members. The lack of trust has led to the absence of people investing in the community. With individuals from both in and outside of the community not investing in the area, there has been a decline in development leading to a lack of economic growth. This is also a contributing factor to entrepreneurs within the community starting business in other surrounding communities not served by DeKalb Medical System. The group expressed the need for strong community leaders due to them being a key component necessary to build a healthy community.

To supplement the qualitative data provided by the focus groups, thirty-eight (38) key informant interviews were conducted by the Director of the Regulatory and Government Relations of DeKalb Medical System and DeKalb Medical System interns from the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University. The individuals interviewed included individuals from organizations serving medically underserved, low-income, minorities and populations with chronic disease needs in the community as well as public health representatives and public officials.  During the interview sessions, the participants were asked to identify the primary factors that contribute to the current health status of the community. The principal drivers contributing to this perceived health status included access to care, chronic diseases, demographic changes and health disparities. The top three health needs of the community identified by interviewees included access to care, chronic diseases, and health and wellness.

Access to Care

Similar to those included in the focus group discussions, access to care was also identified as a top health need among those interviewed. The lack of access to preventative care and gaps in care were identified as contributing factors. The interviewees discussed the existence of hospitals within the area, however, it is perceived that the lack of service availability is negatively impacting the community’s health. Lastly, the absence of Medicaid expansion was felt to be a disadvantage to the working poor; preventing them from receiving appropriate coverage.

Chronic Diseases

The presence of chronic disease within the community was frequently mentioned as a top health need by interviewees. Specifically, diabetes, drug-resistant tuberculosis, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, heart disease, kidney disease, and obesity were mentioned. The need for preventative care was discussed; however, poor disease management was the primary topic of concern as it relates to chronic disease.

 

 

Health and Wellness

A community focused on health and wellness leads to healthier individuals, according to the individuals included in the interviews. However, it was mentioned that the community served has barriers preventing a health and wellness-focused community. Cultural differences exist among residents which serve as an obstacle due to varying beliefs and traditions. Currently, the majority of citizens possess poor diet and exercise habits. Becoming more active and increasing efforts to improve nutrition are needed to improve the health and wellness of the community.

The focus groups were also asked to identify the barriers that lead to poor health in the community. Factors identified included cultural diversity, food swamps, non-compliance with disease management, lack of local resources, and the prevalence of mental illness. The following populations were identified by the interviewees as vulnerable groups that need additional consideration when addressing health needs:

  • Minority populations
  • Elderly
  • Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender individuals

 

The interview and focus group participants and the populations they serve for this community are documented in the table in Appendix B.

 

 

 

 


Health Needs Matrix

Quantitative and qualitative data were analyzed and displayed as a health needs matrix to help identify the most significant community health needs.  Below is the matrix for the community served by DeKalb Medical at Downtown Decatur.


 

Prioritizing Community Health Needs

In order to identify and prioritize the significant needs of the community, the hospital established a comprehensive method of taking into account all available relevant data including community input.

First, specific needs were pinpointed when an indicator for the community served did not in the corresponding state benchmarks. Then an index of magnitude analysis was conducted on those indicators to determine the degree of difference from the benchmark to indicate the relative severity of the issue. The outcomes of this quantitative analysis were aligned with the qualitative findings of the community input sessions to bring forth a list of health needs in the community. These health needs were then classified into one of four quadrants within a health needs matrix: high data, low qualitative; low data, low qualitative; low data, high qualitative; or high data, high qualitative. 

The matrix was reviewed on May 4, 2016 by DeKalb Medical System’s leadership in a session to establish the significant health needs and then to prioritize them. The meeting was moderated by Truven Health and included an overview of the community demographics, summary of health data findings and an explanation of the quadrants of the health needs matrix.

Session participants included:

Executive Vice President of Strategy

Vice President of Legal Services and Chief Compliance Officer

Vice President of Marketing, Communications, and Corporate Health

Vice President DeKalb Medical Foundation

Director of Regulatory and Government Relations

 

 

Participants all agreed that the health needs indicated in the quadrants labeled “high qualitative, high quantitative”, “high data, low qualitative”, and “low data, high qualitative” should be considered the community’s significant health needs.

In order to prioritize the specific health needs, the participants identified four criteria for prioritization of the needs. The characteristics included feasibility, hospital capacity, ability to measure, and alignment with the hospital’s strategy. Feasibility ensures health needs are amenable to interventions, acknowledges the resources necessary for change to occur, and determines whether or not it is preventable. Determining if the hospital has the capacity to act on an issue was also a criteria utilized for prioritization of needs; this also included whether any economic, social, cultural, or political considerations are necessary. The ability to measure progress on the initiative must be quantifiable to determine whether not interventions are impacting the health need, this was also considered during prioritization. Finally, aligning the prioritized health needs with the strategy of the health system was considered to ensure current strengths and focuses are leveraged.

Once the prioritization criteria were determined, each significant health need was rated on each of the five criteria utilizing a scale of one to ten, with one being low and ten being high. Each participant’s criteria ratings were then summed to create the participant’s rating for each need. The scores for each need were then summed across all participants to create an overall score. The list of significant health needs was than prioritized based on the overall scores.

The meeting participants subsequently chose from the top prioritized health needs as those which will be addressed by DeKalb Medical at Downtown Decatur. The needs to be addressed are as follows:

  1. Education and training of community providers
  2. Education and collaboration between resources
  3. Access to long-term care

Description of Health Needs to be Addressed

Education and Training for Community Providers

Focus groups and interviewees discussed the need for providers within the community to understand the primary drivers impacting the health of the community. When physicians are aware of health priorities, they have the ability to provide better care for their patients and the community.

Participants discussed the diversity of the community served by DeKalb Medical at Downtown Decatur. According to County Health Rankings, the index of non-white to white community members is 65 in DeKalb County and 63 in Fulton County. This is compared to an index of 48 in both Georgia and the United States. The presence of various ethnic groups and refugees contributes to difficulties related to the cultural competence of providers. Education of providers regarding cultural needs and the ability for them to communicate with all patients effectively is vital for appropriate care and support of the community regarding preventative care, chronic disease management and healthy living choices.

Many healthcare resources exist within the community; however, they are often under-utilized. According to participants, physicians are not aware of the programs available to community members. Training providers regarding existing resources will promote an increase in referrals and utilization of healthcare programs in the community.

Education and Collaboration between Resources

The focus groups and interviewees identified multiple issues surrounding health literacy and the negative impact its absence places on the community. Specifically, it was noted that many residents in the community are now insured under the new health care exchanges implemented with the Affordable Care Act. According to Truven Health’s ZIP code estimates, the number of community members insured privately through the healthcare exchanges was 10% in 2015. Over the next five years, individuals in the community insured through the exchanges is projected to experience the highest amount of growth out of all payers. [1] Resources need to be available to these individuals within the community to promote adequate utilization of coverage.

As previously mentioned, providers must also be able to guide their patients effectively across the continuum of care. Educating both providers and patients is needed regarding the resources that are available within the community served. Focus group participants and interviewees discussed the negative impact the providers’ lack of understanding of services available is having on the community.

Participants discussed specific areas within the community that are comprised of underserved, international individuals with many sub-cultures and unique communication challenges. Additional resources are needed in these areas to adequately understand their cultures, beliefs, and perception of health. Focus groups members specifically stated the resources needed and the extent to which they are connected to the healthcare system is unclear.

Although there are new initiatives in the community focused on outreach and education, participants expressed the need for continued expansion to all areas in the community. Managing chronic disease from both a professional and personal standpoint is difficult due to the lack of resources in the community. Challenges present for community members with chronic disease due to the absence of resources focusing on care coordination and the lack of collaboration between existing resources. A lack of coordination between resource providers leads to duplication. With the appropriate management of programs, additional resources the community is currently lacking could be added while removing the duplicates.

Access to Long-term Care

DeKalb Medical at Downtown Decatur provides long-term acute care; however, increased access to the facility is necessary to improve the health of the community. Currently, the facility is not a Medicaid certified provider; therefore, residents with Medicaid coverage are unable to receive care at the facility, this is equivalent to 12% of the community served according to Truven Health’s insurance coverage estimates. [2] The number of individuals unable to receive care due to the absence of Medicaid certification is 119,589 in Fulton County, 104,897 in DeKalb County, and 94,312 in Gwinnett County.

To improve access to long-term care in the community, caregivers must be trained to treat patients requiring long term acute care services. Over the last few years, DeKalb Medical System has had only a few nursing students do long-term acute care rotation at Downtown Decatur. The hospital can assist in education of providers by working in partnership with nursing programs in the area to facilitate the rotation of student nurses through the facility. As student nurses are increasingly exposed to these specialized patients, the access to care will improve with a larger volume of trained caregivers entering the workforce.

Patients with complex medical or rehabilitative needs are typically those in need of long-term acute care. With this being said, patients with brain and head injuries are commonly admitted for treatment. Care transitions for these patients need to improve to ensure care is properly provided across the continuum. Adequate care coordination is needed to promote positive outcomes for this population. The continuum begins at the time of injury or illness and continues through the short-term acute care hospitalization, long-term acute care hospitalization, and discharge to outpatient rehab.


Summary      

DeKalb Medical System conducted its Community Health Needs Assessments beginning December, 2015 to identify and begin addressing the health needs of the communities they serve. Using both qualitative community feedback as well as publically available and proprietary health indicators, DeKalb Medical System was able to identify and prioritize community health needs for their health care system.  With the goal of improving the health of the community, implementation plans with specific tactics and time frames will be developed for the health needs chosen by DeKalb Medical System to address the community served.


Key Health Indicator Sources

American Medical Association

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

National HIV Surveillance System

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS)

ESRI & US Census Tigerline Files

National Vital Statistics System-Mortality (NVSS-M), (CDC, NCHS)

Bureau of Labor Statistics

Fatality Analysis Reporting System

National Vital Statistics System-Natality (NVSS-N)

CDC Diabetes Interactive Atlas

FBI Crime in the United Locals

Safe Drinking Water Information System

CDC WONDER Environmental Data

Georgia Department of Education

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Admin (SAMHSA)

CDC WONDER Mortality Data

Georgia Department of Human Resources, Division of Family and Children Services.

U.S Census, Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Georgia Department of Public Health

U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey

CMS Chronic Condition Warehouse (CCW)

Health Resources and Services Administration

U.S. Census, County Business Patterns

CMS, National Provider Identification file

Kaiser Family Foundation

U.S. Census, Small Area Health Insurance Estimates

Comprehensive Housing Affordability Strategy (CHAS) data

National Center for Education Statistics

Uniform Crime Reporting - FBI

Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care

National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS)

USDA Food Environment Atlas

EDFacts

National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention

Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS) / DeKalb Board of Health

Organization

DeKalb Medical System

Public Health

Medically Underserved

Low Income

Chronic Disease Needs

Minorities

Workswell Program

 

 

 

 

X

 

Mercy Housing/ Allegra Point Senior Center

 

 

 

X

 

 

DeKalb Medical

X

X

X

X

X

X

Sisters by Choice

 

 

X

X

X

X

DeKalb Board of Health

 

X

X

X

X

X

DeKalb Community Service Board

 

 

X

X

X

X

Live Healthy DeKalb

 

X

X

X

X

X

Side by Side Brain Injury Clubhouse

 

 

X

X

X

X

Personal Care Home

 

 

 

X

 

 

CDC

 

X

X

X

X

X

City of Lithonia Government

 

 

X

X

 

X

Heritage Hospice

 

 

 

 

 

 

DeKalb Chamber of Commerce

 

X

X

X

X

X

DeKalb Medical Cancer Center

X

 

X

X

X

X

DeKalb Medical Community Outreach

 

 

X

 

X

X

DeKalb Medical Hillandale

X

X

X

X

X

X

Decatur Active Living

 

 

 

X

 

X

Metro Atlanta Ambulance Services

 

 

X

X

X

X

Susan G. Komen - Atlanta

 

 

 

X

 

X

Georgians for a Healthy Future

 

 

X

X

X

 

Clarkston Community Health Center

 

 

X

X

X

X

National Coalition of 100 Black Women Decatur – DeKalb Chapter

 

 

 

X

 

X

First Medical Care/Clarkston Clinic

 

X

X

X

X

X

 

Women Watch Afrika

 

X

X

X

 

X

Organization

DeKalb Medical System

Public Health

Medically Underserved

Low Income

Chronic Disease Needs

Minorities

St. Thomas Moore Catholic Church

 

 

X

X

X

X

DeKalb Medical at Downtown Decatur

X

X

X

X

X

X

DeKalb County Government

 

 

X

X

 

X

North DeKalb Senior Center

 

X

X

X

 

X

City of Lithonia Government

 

 

X

X

 

X

Healthcare Georgia Foundation

 

 

X

X

X

X

National Coalition of Black Women

 

 

 

X

 

X

Center for Pan Asian Community Services

 

X

X

X

X

X

Decatur Recreation Department

 

 

 

X

 

X

Panola Gardens - National Church Residences

 

 

X

 

 

 

Mercy Housing

 

 

X

 

 

 

DeKalb Medical Physicians Group

X

X

X

X

X

X

Alpha Kappa Alpha (Tau Pi Omega Chapter)

 

 

 

 

 

X

CDC: Epidemiology and Surveillance Unit on Heart Disease and Stroke

 

 

 

 

X

 

Physicians Care Clinic

 

X

X

X

X

X

South DeKalb Center of Healthy Living

 

 

X

X

X

X

First United Methodist Church of Decatur

 

 

 

X

 

 

City of Clarkson

 

 

X

X

 

X

AMR Ambulance Service

 

X

X

X

X

X

Senior Connections

 

X

X

X

X

 

Grady Health System

 

X

X

X

X

X

DeKalb Board of Health

 

X

X

X

X

X

 

 

Resources Identified via Community Input

Workswell Program

Heritage Hospice

St. Thomas Moore Catholic Church

South DeKalb Center of Healthy Living

Mercy Housing/ Allegra Point Senior Center

DeKalb Chamber of Commerce

DeKalb Medical Physicians Group

First United Methodist Church of Decatur

Sisters by Choice

DeKalb Medical Cancer Center

DeKalb County Government

City of Clarkson

DeKalb Board of Health

DeKalb Medical Community Outreach

North DeKalb Senior Center

AMR Ambulance Service

DeKalb Community Service Board

Women Watch Afrika

City of Lithonia Government

Senior Connections

Live Healthy DeKalb

Decatur Active Living

Healthcare Georgia Foundation

Grady Health System

Side by Side Brain Injury Clubhouse

Metro Atlanta Ambulance Services

National Coalition of Black Women

Bornelus Insurance Agency

Personal Care Home

Susan G. Komen - Atlanta

Center for Pan Asian Community Services

Mercy Housing

CDC

Georgians for a Healthy Future

Decatur Recreation Department

National Coalition of 100 Black Women Decatur – DeKalb Chapter

City of Lithonia Government

Clarkston Community Health Center

Panola Gardens - National Church Residences

First Medical Care/Clarkston Clinic

Physicians Care Clinic

CDC: Epidemiology and Surveillance Unit on Heart Disease and Stroke

Alpha Kappa Alpha (Tau Pi Omega Chapter)

 

 


 

Community Healthcare Facilities[3]

Facility Name

Facility Type

Affiliation

Address

City

Zip

Anchor Hospital

Hospital

Focus on Behavioral Health

5454 Yorktowne Dr

College Park

30349

Atlanta Medical Center

Hospital

Wellstar

303 Pkwy Dr NE

Atlanta

30312

Atlanta Medical Center - South Campus

Hospital

Wellstar

1170 Cleveland Ave

East Point

30344

Atlanta VA Medical Center

Hospital

Veterans Hospital

1670 Clairmont Rd

Decatur

30033

Childrens Healthcare Egleston

Hospital

CHOA

1405 Clifton Rd

Atlanta

30322

Childrens Healthcare Scottish Rite

Hospital

CHOA

1001 Johnson Ferry Rd

Atlanta

30342

Childrens Hospital Of Atlanta  - Hughes Spalding

Hospital

CHOA

35 Jesse Hill Jr Drive Se

Atlanta

30303

DeKalb Medical Center

Hospital

DeKalb Medical

2701 N Decatur Rd

Decatur

30033

DeKalb Medical Center At Hillandale

Hospital

DeKalb Medical

2801 DeKalb Medical Pkwy

Lithonia

30058

DeKalb Medical At Downtown Decatur

Hospital

DeKalb Medical

450 Candler St

Decatur

30030

Eastside Medical Center

Hospital


1700 Medical Way

Snellville

30078

Emory Center for Rehabilitation Medicine

Hospital

Emory Healthcare

1441 Clifton Rd NE

Atlanta

30322

Emory Johns Creek Hospital

Hospital

Emory Healthcare

6325 Hospital Pkwy

Johns Creek

30097

Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital

Hospital

Emory Healthcare

1455 Montreal Rd

Tucker

30084

Emory University Hospital

Hospital

Emory Healthcare

1364 Clifton Rd NE

Atlanta

30322

Emory University Hospital Midtown

Hospital

Emory Healthcare

550 Peachtree St NE

Atlanta

30308

Georgia Regional Hospital Atlanta

Hospital


3073 Panthersville Rd

Decatur

30034

Grady Memorial Hospital

Hospital


80 Jesse Hill Jr Drive SE

Atlanta

30303

Gwinnett Medical Center - Duluth

Hospital

Gwinnet Medical Center

3620 Howell Ferry Rd

Duluth

30096

Gwinnett Medical Center - Lawrenceville

Hospital

Gwinnet Medical Center

1000 Medical Center Blvd

Lawrenceville

30045

Hillside Hospital

Hospital


690 Courtenay Drive NE

Atlanta

30306

Kindred Hospital Atlanta

Hospital

Kindred

705 Juniper St NE

Atlanta

30308

Laurel Heights Hospital

Hospital


934 Briarcliff Rd NE

Atlanta

30306

North Fulton Regional Hospital

Hospital


3000 Hospital Blvd

Roswell

30076

Northside Hospital Atlanta

Hospital


1000 Johnson Ferry Rd NE

Atlanta

30342

Peachford Hospital

Hospital


2151 Peachford Rd

Atlanta

30338

Piedmont Hospital

Hospital

Piedmont

1968 Peachtree Rd NW

Atlanta

30309

Regency Hospital Of South Atlanta

Hospital


1170 Cleveland Ave

East Point

30344

Facility Name

Facility Type

Affiliation

Address

City

Zip

Select Specialty Hospital - Atlanta

Hospital


550 Peachtree St NE

Atlanta

30308

Shepherd Center

Hospital


2020 Peachtree Rd NW

Atlanta

30309

St Joseph’s Hospital Of Atlanta

Hospital

Emory Healthcare

5665 Peachtree Dunwoody Rd

Atlanta

30342

Summit Ridge Hospital

Hospital


250 Scenic Hwy

Lawrenceville

30046

Wesley Woods Geriatric Hospital

Hospital

Emory Healthcare

1821 Clifton Rd NE

Atlanta

30329

Wesley Woods Long Term Hospital

Hospital


1821 Clifton Rd NE

Atlanta

30329

AG Rhodes Health & Rehab Atlanta

Skilled Nursing

AG Rhodes Health & Rehab

350 Blvd SE

Atlanta

30312

AG Rhodes Health & Rehab Wesley Woods

Skilled Nursing

AG Rhodes Health & Rehab

1819 Clifton Rd NE

Atlanta

30329

Bonterra Nursing Center

Skilled Nursing


2801 Felton Dr

East Point

30344

Briarcliff Haven Health And Rehab

Skilled Nursing


1000 Briarcliff Rd

Atlanta

30306

Budd Terrace At Wesley Woods

Skilled Nursing


1817 Clifton Road NE

Atlanta

30329

Christian City Rehabilitation Center

Skilled Nursing


7300 Lester Rd

Union City

30291

College Park Health Care Center

Skilled Nursing


1765 Temple Ave

College Park

30337

Crestview Health & Rehab Center

Skilled Nursing


2800 Springdale Rd

Atlanta

30315

D Scott Hudgens Center

Skilled Nursing


3500 Annandale Rd

Suwanee

30024

Rosemont

Skilled Nursing


5160 Springview Ave

Stone Mountain

30083

Delmar Gardens Of Gwinnett Operating

Skilled Nursing


3100 Club Dr

Lawrenceville

30044

East Lake Arbor Health Care Center

Skilled Nursing


304 5th Ave

Decatur

30030

Fairburn Health Care Center

Skilled Nursing


178 Campbellton St

Fairburn

30213

Fountainview Center

Skilled Nursing


2631 N Druid Hills Rd

Atlanta

30329

Fox Glove Court Care And Rehab

Skilled Nursing


2850 Springdale Rd SW

Atlanta

30315

Georgia Regional Atlanta

Skilled Nursing


3073 Panthersville Rd

Decatur

30034

Facility Name

Facility Type

Affiliation

Address

City

Zip

Golden Living - Briarwood

Skilled Nursing


3888 Lavista Rd

Tucker

30084

Golden Living - Decatur

Skilled Nursing


2787 N Decatur Rd

Decatur

30033

Golden Living - Dunwoody

Skilled Nursing


5470 Meridian Mark Rd

Atlanta

30342

Golden Living - Glenwood

Skilled Nursing


4115 Glenwood Rd

Decatur

30032

Golden Living - Medical Arts

Skilled Nursing


213 Scenic Hwy

Lawrenceville

30045

Grace Healthcare of Tucker

Skilled Nursing


2165 Idlewood Rd

Tucker

30084

Gwinnett Extended Care Center

Skilled Nursing


650 Professional Dr

Lawrenceville

30046

Lagrange Nursing & Rehab Center

Skilled Nursing


2111 W Point Rd

LaGrange

30344

Life Care Center of Gwinnett

Skilled Nursing


3850 Safehaven Dr

Lawrenceville

30044

Life Care Center of Lawrenceville

Skilled Nursing


210 Collins Industrial Way

Lawrenceville

30045

Legacy Nursing & Rehabilitation

Skilled Nursing


460 Auburn Ave

Atlanta

30312

Lenbrook

Skilled Nursing


3747 Peachtree Rd NE

Atlanta

30319

Manorcare Of Decatur

Skilled Nursing


2722 N Decatur

Decatur

30033

Meadowbrook Health & Rehab

Skilled Nursing


4608 Lawrenceville Hwy

Tucker

30084

New London Health Care

Skilled Nursing


2020 McGee Rd

Snellville

30078

Northeast Atlanta Health & Rehab

Skilled Nursing


1500 S Johnson Ferry Rd NE

Atlanta

30319

Nursecare of Buckhead

Skilled Nursing


2920 Pharr Court S NW

Atlanta

30305

Park Springs Health Center

Skilled Nursing


500 Springhouse Cir

Stone Mountain

30087

PruittHealth - Brookhaven

Skilled Nursing


3535 Ashton Woods Dr

Atlanta

30319

PruittHealth - Decatur

Skilled Nursing


3200 Panthersville Rd

Decatur

30034

PruittHealth - Fairburn

Skilled Nursing


7560 Butner Rd

Fairburn

30213

PruittHealth - Lanier

Skilled Nursing


2451 Peach Industrial Blvd

Buford

30518

Facility Name

Facility Type

Affiliation

Address

City

Zip

PruittHealth - Lilburn

Skilled Nursing


788 Indian Trail

Lilburn

30047

PruittHealth - West Atlanta

Skilled Nursing


2645 Whiting St NW

Atlanta

30318

RHC At Lakewood

Skilled Nursing


1980 Arrow St

Atlanta

30310

Roswell Nursing & Rehab Center

Skilled Nursing


1109 Green St

Roswell

30075

Sadie G Mays Health & Rehabilitation

Skilled Nursing


1821 Anderson Ave NW

Atlanta

30314

Salude - The Art of Recovery

Skilled Nursing


601 Northholt Pkwy

Suwanee

30024

Scepter Health & Rehab of Snellville

Skilled Nursing


3000 Lenora Church Rd

Snellville

30078

Signature Healthcare Of Buckhead

Skilled Nursing


54 Peachtree Park Drive NE

Atlanta

30309

The William Breman Jewish Home

Skilled Nursing


3150 Howell Mill Rd NW

Atlanta

30327

Traditions Health And Rehabilitation

Skilled Nursing


2816 Evans Mill Rd

Lithonia

30058

Westminster Commons

Skilled Nursing


560 St Charles Ave

Atlanta

30308

*Facility type “hospital” includes short-term acute care, long-term acute care, inpatient mental hospitals, and inpatient rehab facilities.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



[1] Truven Health Analytics, 2015 ZIP Code Estimates

[2] Truven Health Analytics, 2015 Insurance Coverage Estimates

[3] Truven Health Analytics, 2016 Market Expert National Facility Database

2701 North Decatur Road Decatur, GA 30033
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Patient Inquiries: 404.501.5200

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